Approach

Approach

a creative service · since 2004


DESIGN + BUILD

 


Beautifully made woodwork isn’t always a success.  Even well-crafted work can be out of step with the larger interior —  it’s beautiful in one respect, but somehow, it doesn’t work.

Paul Janus Building Arts views architectural woodwork in a larger context — as means to a greater end.  This path looks to the interior’s function and potential; from this vantage point millwork performs as effective enabler in the interior’s success.  Design — through the myriad traits of scale, layout, color, lighting and on — is the catalyst that transforms ‘well-made’ into the elusive, beautiful interior.

Design + Build — [it’s not about trim]  Millwork is stunning when integral to an interior’s function and presence


 



DESIGN + BUILD PROJECT ST
UDY:
North Stamford, CT

 

Project Overview  —  Home showing the corollary wear that’s inevitable with a big, busy family
Project Site  —  Great room/ Dining room/ adjoining Foyer and Staircase
Project  —  Client wanted a fresh start to this interior to reset and keep pace with their evolving lifestyle

Project design notes:

  • Architectural character beckoned, though my first impression upon visiting the home was the spaces felt dim.  Two oversized windows numbed any concieous sense of this though I could see the exposure was northerly, which is to say always indirect. (North light is preferred by artists precisely because it is so!)  The indirect exposure was lessened further by a deep porch overhang, and a heavily-wooded site of tall oaks.  The interior was dim, and no amount of new paint, drapes and baseboard was going to change that.
  • Coming into the meeting however, I had noticed something: I asked about the attic space above… Stepping outside, one could see roof dormers were centered over the two large windows below… a quick visit to the attic found it awash in light!!  Their high placement above the porch let the sky’s light in. 
  • The idea was clear: open the space below to these attic dormers. 

(It’s useful to note skylights often have the opposite issue: too much light, moving across the room all day, fading furnishings, and dictating the space’s mood based on what’s happening outside.  Instead, this north orientation was a plus that avoided altogether issues of direct sun.)

  • We discussed use of the rooms for traffic flow, lighting, and color.  Drawings were developed and presented culminating in a floor plan and millwork design that put these changes into play.

Solution  —  The finished space presents two vaulted clerestories bringing height, dynamism and abundant natural light to a lovely interior.  These changes were integrated and enabled through the use of tailored millwork.  Learn more from Architectural Digest on the long history and benefits of clerestory windows in interior architecture.

a creative service · since 2004


MILLWORK PREPLANNING

 


Interior millwork may tend to occur in the final phase of building, but it’s greatest potential is best accessed in planning for early-phase construction.

 Paul Janus Building Arts  consults on opportunities for millwork in construction planning:

  • Planning and layout for stairs, steps and landings
  • Placement of windows, doors, and interior partitions
  • Placement of fixtures, ducts, load-bearing members
  • Placement of wiring for lighting, switching and receptacles
  • Successful integration of a new addition into an existing structure

Preplanningproviding for millwork with unmatched grace and reach while offering efficiency in material and assembly cost



 
PRE-PLANNING PROJECT STUDY
:
Cold Spring, NY

 

Project Overview  —  Millwork preplanning for new construction in preparation for design and build.

Project Site  —  Multiple rooms in residence including the foyer entry, dining and living rooms, and master bedroom.

Project  —  Former-client who was downsizing, and returning for planning in her new home.

  • I reviewed building plans while the client was in the late stages of costing and planning general construction.
  • We discussed a range of opportunities for millwork and associated costs. We outlined a budget and strategy for bringing the finished space to a level the client wanted in this new home.
  • Plans were marked-up with specifications/ locations for lighting and switches.  Unnecessary trim specified in the original plans was highlighted for omission. Changes here accelerated delivery calendar as well as lowering the client’s cost for the omitted work.
  • The work was cost-out and calendared to start immediately after closing. General construction began, and we remained in contact through the early framing and services rough-in.
  • The decorative woodwork phase went quickly and smoothly, enjoying the preplanning and specification done during the design phase. Tremendous benefit in saved time and cost was fruit to the millwork preplanning effort.

 

a creative service · since 2004


SUPPORT + BUILD

 


Your design vision’s success hinges on carefully considered traits that are often subtle in nature.  These aspects can go missed by the untrained eye, and builders can famously wrestle with ‘getting’ this nuance.  Disconnects are common between design and delivery efforts, and a tug-of-war can become the project tone… The result can be a compromised and costly outcome.

Paul Janus Building Arts brings a designer sensibility to building a design specification.  This shift keeps the thrust of your vision intact as the challenges in delivery are navigated.

Support + Build is devoted to supporting your creative vision and delivering a gorgeous result:

  • converting your schematics and sketches into shop drawings
  • offering input on quality and efficiency gains in fabrication
  • providing assembly details that support your project aesthetic and clarify the planned outcome

 

Support + Builddelivery solutions that advance your vision’s success


 


 
SUPPORT + BUILD PROJECT STUDY:

Hastings-on-Hudson, NY

 

Project architect  —  Barbara Corwin LEED AP, New York

Project Overview  —  Architect referred project, whose design was approved prior to meeting client.

Project Site  —  A large staircase hall in a more than century-old and highly appointed home.

Project  —  20 lineal feet of new casework running floor-to-10’ ceiling integrating gilded display cabinet provided by client.  An interior already rich in presence would demand a similar level of aesthetic and finish quality.

 

  • Architect provided design elevations showing core component layout with gilded case, and detailed lighting and carved moldings usage. Established was the idea the casework was always part of the home, and the gilded piece had always been paired with the casework.
  • Architect plan’s dimensions were schematic conveying concept proportion and balance. Actual dimensions would vary, but this would serve as guide to relate recommended modifications against.
  • I measured the site and recorded significant settling including floors far out of level, walls out of plumb, and plaster and lathe walls that weren’t straight. This is not uncommon for buildings this age, and it’s a reality that is always at odds with building square. When the work is wall-to-wall and floor-to-ceiling, it’s critical for design planning to have reconciliation in mind.
  • Project change: With schematics and a measured sense of the building in hand, my interest focused on two piers that ‘trapped’ the casework on both ends. These piers, nearly 10’ tall, were not straight or plumb. I envisioned this woodwork looking lovely until noticing the long uneven gap between the casework and pier. It could be filled, but would instantly make the casework feel added on.
  • The clarification offered a fix: to include the piers as part of the casework eliminating the issue. I recorded measurements, created drawings, cost out the change, and contacted the architect. We discussed and weighed the issue’s impact, and discussed the suggested workaround. In agreement, the idea was presented to the client.
  • Drawings and budget were approved; entire project was built off-site and delivered at once for installation. The collaboration and project was a pleasure to be part of, and the clients’ delight upon completion an inspiration.

 

a creative service · since 2004


SPACE PLAN EVALUATION

 


Though we love architectural millwork . . . it’s comfortable, livable interiors that we truly adore!   We believe transformational success begins with the plan —  it’s no wonder space planning is a founding component of this creative service.

Paul Janus Building Arts space use evaluation and planning through scale drawings:

  • Identifying existing plan strengths to develop and failings to correct
  • Addressing efficiency, flow and balance in space use
  • Identifying plan purpose and tailoring allocated space
  • Enabling space plan success through defined millwork

Space Planing for building out:

  • Evaluating plan expansion by exhausting existing plan usage first
  • Validating solutions for expansion by invigorating pre-existing assets

Space PlanningThe fitted plan is cornerstone to the performance of millwork in stunning interiors



 
SPACE PLANNING PROJECT TYPES:
  • Plan Rejuvenation  —  Bringing new life to an interior
  • New Construction  —  Focusing on the challenge and opportunity of a blank slate
  • Built Addition  —  Harmonizing dynamic integration of change into the greater whole
  • Transition  —  Fitting a plan to changing needs:  empty-nest, retirement, making a new home purchase yours
 

 

a creative service · since 2004


WALK- THROUGH CONSULT

 


Even a client’s informed sense of their space can benefit from a professional eye unburdened by the familiar.  Fresh observation presents new clarity in approaching challenges, often revealing cause-and-affect that’s gone unnoticed, and often misunderstood.  A Walk-through Consult is a fluid, on-site, conversive look at the interior —  a review that uncovers potential.  Of course any built project begins with a conversation:  in contrast, this process steps back from nitty-gritty specifics to assess core design avenues and choosing the right battle.

Paul Janus Building Arts identifies planning solutions that are cleverly dynamic, comfortably appropriate, and always smart in cost and approach.

Walk-Through Consulta process for aesthetics and design planning that pivots on savvy paths forward

 



 
 PROJECT TYPES:
  • Evaluating interior millwork integration  —  aesthetics, placement as budgeting, calendaring
  • Evaluating color and lighting  —  room-to-room, across the larger interior
  • Evaluating artwork for emphasis  —  use in selection, placement and assemblage
  • Evaluating new ventures  —  an unbuilt space, a prospective purchase, a new lease, a new business venture
  • Evaluating a kitchen upgrade for planning and configuration

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save