· Design Approach ·

· Design Approach ·

inspired woodwork · Since 2004


M i l l w o r k   D e s i g n


·  Architectural millwork in the stunning interior  ·


Paul Janus Building Arts views architectural woodwork as means to a greater end and believes expert craft is not alone in guaranteeing success.  It is integration, space use, and design strategy that catalyzes ‘well-made’ into the splendid interior.

  



PROJECT ST
UDY: 
North Stamford, CT

Project Overview:  A home showing the effects of a large family over time

Project Site:  Great room/ Dining room/ adjoining Foyer and Staircase 

Project:  The client wanted a fresh start and an interior to get in front of their busy family’s lifestyle.

Project Notes:

√ Architectural character beckoned, though my first impression was the space felt dark. While two oversized windows belied this feeling, the northerly/ always-indirect exposure of those windows said otherwise. The issue was magnified by the facade’s deep porch overhang and cinched by the (beautiful but) heavily-wooded tall oaks site. The interior was dim, and no amount of new paint, drapery, or trim work would change that.

√   In arriving to meet, I recalled dormers on the roof directly over the first floor. I asked to see the attic space above these rooms and was delighted to find the attic awash in daylight! Two dormer-windows situated high above the porch shade saw past the trees to the sky.

√ The idea immediately: open the spaces below to the attic windows above. It’s useful to note that a common issue with skylights is they often have the opposite problem of too much light tracking all day across furnishings and fading them to commandeer the room’s mood with whatever the day’s like outside. The protection industry combatting this is evidence as window shades and UV blocking films. However, the beauty of north-facing skylights avoids this and instead allows even, indirect sun all day regardless of the weather: this is why artist studios are always north-facing!

 √ We discussed the use of the rooms for traffic flow, lighting, and color. Drawings were developed and presented to show a floor plan and millwork design that satisfied these goals.

Solution:  The finished space presents two vaulted clerestories offering abundant natural light and dynamic height in the interior — architectural millwork integrated these bold, transformative changes.  

Architectural Digest published a story on the use of clerestory windows some years later.

inspired woodwork · Since 2004


D e s i g n   I n t e g r a t i o n


·   Millwork statements with unmatched grace and reach   ·


Paul Janus Building Arts folds millwork into early-phase construction, realizing cost savings in delivery and hidden potential in the outcome:

√ New millwork and additions into the whole

√ Lighting, switching, and vent ducts

√ Windows, room entries, and structural supports

√ Staircase layout and detailing

 



 
PROJECT STUDYCold Spring, NY

Project Overview:  Millwork planning for new construction in preparation for the design and build.

Project Site:  Multiple rooms in residence, including the foyer entry, dining and living rooms, and master bedroom.

Project:  Work for previous-client downsizing and building a new home.

Project Notes:

√ Review of building plans while the client was in the later-stage of costing general construction.

√ We discussed a range of opportunities for millwork and associated costs. Budget and strategy were defined to finish the space at a level the client desired.

√ Plans were marked-up speccing changes that impacted millwork goals. Superfluous trim was omitted, accelerating the project calendar and earning credit for the omission.

√ Millwork was cost-out and calendared to start at house closing, and contact continued through general construction to confirm framing and electric rough-in were correct.

√ Millwork shop drawings allowed for millwork assembly off-site and before install, saving client delivery time and cost.

inspired woodwork · Since 2004


D e s i g n   S u p p o r t


·  Delivering your vision’s success  ·


Paul Janus Building Arts  supports clients with design drawings in hand by providing critical design planning that keeps their vision in focus:

√ Creating measured shop drawings from sketches

√ Suggesting improvements for improvements in quality and cost savings 

√ Providing assembly details

 


 


 
PROJECT STUDY: Hastings-on-Hudson, NY

Project Architect:  Barbara Corwin LEED AP, New York

Project Overview:  Architect referred project with core design statement in place

Project Site:  Large staircase hall in a more than century-old and highly appointed home.

Project:  20 lineal feet of new casework running floor-to-10′ ceiling integrating provided gilded display cabinet. An interior already rich in presence would demand a like-aesthetic and level of finish quality.

Project Notes:

√ The architect provided design elevations showing core component layout with a gilded case, detailed lighting, and carved moldings. Established was the idea new casework would appear part of the home vs. furniture, with the gilded piece appearing as if it was always part of the casework ensemble.

√ Plan dimensions provided by the architect were schematic conveying concept proportion and balance. Actual measurements would vary, but this would serve as a guide against which to recommend modifications.

√ Site measurements occurred, and essential considerations, including floors significantly out of level, walls out of plumb, and wavy plaster walls. While typical for buildings this age, it’s also a reality at odds with building square. When the finished work makes contact with walls and ceiling, it is critical that design planning involves reconciliation.

Project Change:  With the desired schematics and hard space measurements in hand, attention turned immediately to the two piers left and right that ‘bookended’ the casework: 10′ tall, the piers were not straight or plumb.  Minus a plan, an uneven floor-to-ceiling gap would frame this impressive casework.  Using a fill piece would have the casework feeling added in vs. part of the building.

Solution:  Include the piers as part of the casework. This full assessment, including measurements and creating drawings, occurred before contacting the architect. She reviewed the issue’s impact, weighed the cost/ benefit of the solution presented, and elected to present the change to the client.

√ The client approved the change, drawings, and budget. The project was built off-site and delivered for install.  

The collaboration and final work were a pleasure to be part of, and the architect’s and clients’ delight on completion was an inspiration.

inspired woodwork · Since 2004


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